December 14-15, 2017

MedTech Impact 2017

Venetian/Palazzo Resort

Las Vegas, NV

(561) 893-8633

info@medtechimpact.com

Author: Heather Johnson

Osso VR wins US DOE EdSim Challenge

The U.S. Department of Education announced Osso VR as the winner in the EdSim Challenge, which called for virtual reality, video game developer, and educational technology communities to submit concepts for immersive simulations that will prepare students for a globally competitive workforce and spur an ecosystem of virtual and augmented reality technology in education.

Five finalists were selected out of 249 submissions. Each finalist received $50,000 in cash as well as in-kind prizes from Oculus and Samsung, and refined their submissions during the Virtual Accelerator phase. Finalists presented playable prototypes to the judges at Demo Day on September 18, 2017, where a live audience joined the Challenge judges at the Department Of Education to see the five finalists compete for the $430,000 grand prize.  The winner was recommended by a panel of judges with expertise in education, gaming, workforce development, emerging technology, and venture capital.

Osso VR is a hands-on surgical training platform that enables users to practice cutting-edge techniques through realistic, hands-on simulations, bridging the gap between career exploration and career preparation. They won $430,000 in cash and additional in-kind prizes from IBM and Microsoft.

Learn more about each of the five finalists’ simulations here.

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Learn more about Osso VR at the 2017 MedTech Impact Expo & Conference in Las Vegas, December 14-15, where Justin Barad, Founder & CEO of Osso VR and editor of medgadget.com will moderate a panel session, New Realities in Medicine – Exploring the Virtual and Augmented Horizon. Other speakers in the session include Arshya Vahabzadeh, M.D., Chief Medical Officer at Brainpower, Matthew Stoudt, CEO of AppliedVR, Carrie Shaw, CEO of Embodied Labs, and Osamah Choudhry, CEO at MediVis. LEARN MORE.

Wearables Potential Impact on the Top 10 Causes of Death

In 2012, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) indicated about half of all adults (117 million people at the time) had one or more chronic health conditions. By 2014, seven of the top 10 causes of death were chronic diseases, with heart disease and cancer accounting for nearly 46% of all deaths each year. The costliest (86% of the nation’s $2.7 trillion annual health care expenditures) chronic health problems like heart disease, stroke, cancer, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and arthritis, are among the most prevalent, and continue to be on the rise. Considering lack of exercise or physical activity, poor nutrition, tobacco use, and excessive alcohol consumption is linked to most of these diseases – they also are the most preventable and reversible. However, compliance in lifestyle change, monitoring and medication management of chronic disease has proven to be a great challenge for clinicians and patients alike. Thanks to innovations and advancements in technology, this is becoming more accessible and convenient for both patient and clinician.

One innovator now offers a solution that supports patient follow up, development of treatments and the ongoing need for study into these conditions, the Byteflies Exploration Kit and data platform. Byteflies, a Belgian-American wearable health start-up, has introduced high precision wearable sensors and a data platform that remotely tracks patient vital signs, from blood flow (PPG) to electro-dermal activity (EDA), electrocardiogram (ECG), motion, respiration, and electromyogram (EMG). The platform is based on insights gained through practical use cases and decades of experience in healthcare and technology applications, and uses extend beyond heart rate measurement.

“When it comes to monitoring health, wearables have incredible potential. However, a wristband that counts steps and measures heart rate just won’t cut it when you’re developing solutions for Parkinson’s disease, pulmonary and cardiovascular conditions, hypertension, or epilepsy,” explains Hans Danneels, CEO and co-founder of Byteflies. “You need to be able to measure raw, accurate data – the kind of data collected in hospitals.”  Their technology is currently used by universities and pharmaceutical companies for detection of epileptic seizures, blood pressure trends, balance, and fatigue.

Advancements and innovations in wearable devices like Byteflies wearable monitors and data platform, smart clothing and footwear to monitor activity and vitals, apps for patient reporting and communication, smart contact lenses monitoring glucose levels, and ingestibles to monitor medicine levels and conditions such as glucose level in diabetics, will help the industry take a much-needed turn to better management, monitoring and prevention. Convenience and ease-of-use for patients has shown promise with increased compliance, allowing physicians to take a more proactive approach in monitoring and treatment.  While wearables won’t solve the chronic disease concerns, and not all patients will understand or be willing to comply, it signals the beginning of a shift and not just a trend.  Availability is increasing, costs are declining and medtech for both physicians and patients is more widely accessible – all a progress in helping clinicians offer more effective care for their patients.

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Education and information in medical technology for clinicians, healthcare execs and ACO’s is critical in the ever-changing field of medicine.  Get valuable insight, learn from industry leaders and connect with fellow medical professionals on technology and better patient care, all while exploring the latest innovations in medtech at the 2017 MedTech Impact Expo & Conference in Las Vegas, December 14-15, 2017.  Learn more.

Trio of Keynotes to Focus on Medical Technology Innovation

Pablos Holman
Pablos Holman Self-described futurist, inventor and notorious hacker “Inventing the Future of Food”

Innovative technologies are entering the medical field at a fast and furious rate – they’re quickly changing the care patients receive and will ultimately affect the health of our nation and the cost and administration of healthcare. This December, two powerful health care industry events will co-locate to provide clinicians, healthcare providers and ACO’s insight and solutions on industry-altering innovations including Sensoria Health’s smart clothing, that will continue to change the way medicine is practiced and evolve into better solutions for diagnosis, treatment, lifestyle change and prevention.  The 25th Annual American Academy of Anti-Aging’s World Congress, and the 2017 MedTech Impact Expo & Conference, held alongside each other at the Venetian/Palazzo Resort in Las Vegas, will feature complementing CME and non-CME education, inspiring world-renowned and accredited industry-leaders, and thousands of products and services. The format sets the stage for effective discussions as to how emerging technologies can and will affect all levels of patient care.

David Rhew
David Rhew, CMO and Head of Healthcare and Fitness at Samsung Electronics of America

Kicking off both events with a Keynote address on Thursday morning, self-described futurist, inventor, and notorious hacker Pablos Holman will discuss “Inventing the Future of Food,” covering the revolutionary shift in the way food is prepared through the advent of 3-D printing.  Thursday afternoon, David Rhew, CMO and Head of Healthcare and Fitness at Samsung Electronics of America, will address the MedTech Impact audience, detailing how innovative digital technologies like wearables, IoT sensors, patient monitors and more are helping to improve costs, increase engagement and improve outcomes across the healthcare process. And finally, Robyn Farmanfarmaian, Angel Investor & Vice President with Invicta Medical and Vice President of Actavalon will close the last day of the conference focusing on how accelerating technologies are empowering the healthcare consumer and allowing patients to be in control of their own health.

Each speaker is a thought leader in the redefining of medicine, and their keynote sessions will inspire attending clinicians, healthcare execs and ACO’s to commit and contribute to a new century of wellness and longevity through the advent and implementation of new technological advances – all of course contributing to the improvement of patient care.

 

Robin Farmanfarmaian
Robin Farmanfarmaian, Angel Investor & Vice President with Invicta Medical and Vice President of Actavalon

For more information and to review the full medtech focused agenda, visit www.medtechimpact.com.

Leading Sportswear and Healthcare Providers Team up to Launch “Smart Clothing” for an Aging Population

According to the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, an older adult is treated for falls in emergency rooms across the country every 11 seconds. Every 19 minutes, an older adult dies from a fall. Stats show more than 800,000 65-or-older Americans suffer from falls each year, not only leading to hospitalizations and further safety concerns, but increasing healthcare costs for individuals and institutions alike.  With the 65+ population expected to rise from 46 million today, to 98 million plus by 2060, the safety concern isn’t going to go away and costs are sure to increase.

 

The rise of concerns, costs, and recent developments in sensors and smart clothing have inspired two leaders from seemingly very different markets to work together on an innovative solution for not only treatment, but prevention. Sensoria, a leader in smart garments and wearable technologies, and Genesis Rehab Services (GRS), a subsidiary of Genesis Healthcare, a recognized enterprise provider in post-acute care, debuted the fruits of their collaboration at the 11th Annual Health 2.0 Conference earlier this month in Santa Clara, California.

 

Sensoria Health Powered by Genesis, featuring body sensors embedded in clothing such as socks and shoes or attached to other clothing as a stand-alone device, will allow clinicians and nurses to monitor a patient’s healthcare needs at home, in assisted living and skilled nursing facilities. From the rehab process after a fall, to pre-emptive detections of situations that could lead to a life-threatening injury, monitoring clinicians can provide real-time communication with caregivers.

Innovative technologies are entering the medical field at a fast and furious rate – they’re quickly changing the care patients receive and will ultimately affect the health of our nation and the cost and administration of healthcare. This December, two powerful health care industry events will co-locate to provide clinicians, healthcare providers and ACO’s insight and solutions on industry-altering innovations including Sensoria Health’s smart clothing, that will continue to change the way medicine is practiced and evolve into better solutions for diagnosis, treatment, lifestyle change and prevention.  The 25th Annual American Academy of Anti-Aging’s World Congress, and the 2017 MedTech Impact Expo & Conference, held alongside each other December 14-15, 2017 at the Venetian/Palazzo Resort in Las Vegas, will feature complementing CME and non-CME education, inspiring world-renowned and accredited industry-leaders, thousands of products and services, and sets the stage for effective discussions as to how emerging technologies can and will affect all levels of patient care. For more information, visit www.medtechimpact.com.

Spotlight: Flex Innovation Center

Journalists attending AdvaMed’s 2017 The MedTech Conference were treated to a behind the scenes look at Flex’s Silicon Valley Innovation Center. Flex, (formally Flextronics) a $25B global electronics manufacturer with 200,000 employees globally, has been utilizing their expertise contract manufacturing across dozens of industries, to apply the lessons learned and fast paths to innovation that are accelerating product development.

Flex’s “Sketch to Scale” comes to life in their innovation center and robotics lab. From conception and design to prototyping and advanced engineering, Flex’s Innovation Center is where the majority of today’s “smart home” and “connected health” technology is designed and manufactured.

“We make everything for everybody,” said John Carlson, President of Flex Health Solutions. Highlights from the tour included flexible circuitry, printed on a stretchable material, that could (potentially) be used to monitor skin biometrics, a sweat sensor that is able to read blood glucose levels from sweat, and an advanced robotics lab that allows Flex to streamline the R&D, design and manufacturing process for their clients.

For more information, visit www.flex.com.