December 14-15, 2017

MedTech Impact 2017

Venetian/Palazzo Resort

Las Vegas, NV

(561) 893-8633

info@medtechimpact.com

Category: Digital Technology

Osso VR wins US DOE EdSim Challenge

The U.S. Department of Education announced Osso VR as the winner in the EdSim Challenge, which called for virtual reality, video game developer, and educational technology communities to submit concepts for immersive simulations that will prepare students for a globally competitive workforce and spur an ecosystem of virtual and augmented reality technology in education.

Five finalists were selected out of 249 submissions. Each finalist received $50,000 in cash as well as in-kind prizes from Oculus and Samsung, and refined their submissions during the Virtual Accelerator phase. Finalists presented playable prototypes to the judges at Demo Day on September 18, 2017, where a live audience joined the Challenge judges at the Department Of Education to see the five finalists compete for the $430,000 grand prize.  The winner was recommended by a panel of judges with expertise in education, gaming, workforce development, emerging technology, and venture capital.

Osso VR is a hands-on surgical training platform that enables users to practice cutting-edge techniques through realistic, hands-on simulations, bridging the gap between career exploration and career preparation. They won $430,000 in cash and additional in-kind prizes from IBM and Microsoft.

Learn more about each of the five finalists’ simulations here.

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Learn more about Osso VR at the 2017 MedTech Impact Expo & Conference in Las Vegas, December 14-15, where Justin Barad, Founder & CEO of Osso VR and editor of medgadget.com will moderate a panel session, New Realities in Medicine – Exploring the Virtual and Augmented Horizon. Other speakers in the session include Arshya Vahabzadeh, M.D., Chief Medical Officer at Brainpower, Matthew Stoudt, CEO of AppliedVR, Carrie Shaw, CEO of Embodied Labs, and Osamah Choudhry, CEO at MediVis. LEARN MORE.

Trio of Keynotes to Focus on Medical Technology Innovation

Pablos Holman
Pablos Holman Self-described futurist, inventor and notorious hacker “Inventing the Future of Food”

Innovative technologies are entering the medical field at a fast and furious rate – they’re quickly changing the care patients receive and will ultimately affect the health of our nation and the cost and administration of healthcare. This December, two powerful health care industry events will co-locate to provide clinicians, healthcare providers and ACO’s insight and solutions on industry-altering innovations including Sensoria Health’s smart clothing, that will continue to change the way medicine is practiced and evolve into better solutions for diagnosis, treatment, lifestyle change and prevention.  The 25th Annual American Academy of Anti-Aging’s World Congress, and the 2017 MedTech Impact Expo & Conference, held alongside each other at the Venetian/Palazzo Resort in Las Vegas, will feature complementing CME and non-CME education, inspiring world-renowned and accredited industry-leaders, and thousands of products and services. The format sets the stage for effective discussions as to how emerging technologies can and will affect all levels of patient care.

David Rhew
David Rhew, CMO and Head of Healthcare and Fitness at Samsung Electronics of America

Kicking off both events with a Keynote address on Thursday morning, self-described futurist, inventor, and notorious hacker Pablos Holman will discuss “Inventing the Future of Food,” covering the revolutionary shift in the way food is prepared through the advent of 3-D printing.  Thursday afternoon, David Rhew, CMO and Head of Healthcare and Fitness at Samsung Electronics of America, will address the MedTech Impact audience, detailing how innovative digital technologies like wearables, IoT sensors, patient monitors and more are helping to improve costs, increase engagement and improve outcomes across the healthcare process. And finally, Robyn Farmanfarmaian, Angel Investor & Vice President with Invicta Medical and Vice President of Actavalon will close the last day of the conference focusing on how accelerating technologies are empowering the healthcare consumer and allowing patients to be in control of their own health.

Each speaker is a thought leader in the redefining of medicine, and their keynote sessions will inspire attending clinicians, healthcare execs and ACO’s to commit and contribute to a new century of wellness and longevity through the advent and implementation of new technological advances – all of course contributing to the improvement of patient care.

 

Robin Farmanfarmaian
Robin Farmanfarmaian, Angel Investor & Vice President with Invicta Medical and Vice President of Actavalon

For more information and to review the full medtech focused agenda, visit www.medtechimpact.com.

Leading Sportswear and Healthcare Providers Team up to Launch “Smart Clothing” for an Aging Population

According to the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, an older adult is treated for falls in emergency rooms across the country every 11 seconds. Every 19 minutes, an older adult dies from a fall. Stats show more than 800,000 65-or-older Americans suffer from falls each year, not only leading to hospitalizations and further safety concerns, but increasing healthcare costs for individuals and institutions alike.  With the 65+ population expected to rise from 46 million today, to 98 million plus by 2060, the safety concern isn’t going to go away and costs are sure to increase.

 

The rise of concerns, costs, and recent developments in sensors and smart clothing have inspired two leaders from seemingly very different markets to work together on an innovative solution for not only treatment, but prevention. Sensoria, a leader in smart garments and wearable technologies, and Genesis Rehab Services (GRS), a subsidiary of Genesis Healthcare, a recognized enterprise provider in post-acute care, debuted the fruits of their collaboration at the 11th Annual Health 2.0 Conference earlier this month in Santa Clara, California.

 

Sensoria Health Powered by Genesis, featuring body sensors embedded in clothing such as socks and shoes or attached to other clothing as a stand-alone device, will allow clinicians and nurses to monitor a patient’s healthcare needs at home, in assisted living and skilled nursing facilities. From the rehab process after a fall, to pre-emptive detections of situations that could lead to a life-threatening injury, monitoring clinicians can provide real-time communication with caregivers.

Innovative technologies are entering the medical field at a fast and furious rate – they’re quickly changing the care patients receive and will ultimately affect the health of our nation and the cost and administration of healthcare. This December, two powerful health care industry events will co-locate to provide clinicians, healthcare providers and ACO’s insight and solutions on industry-altering innovations including Sensoria Health’s smart clothing, that will continue to change the way medicine is practiced and evolve into better solutions for diagnosis, treatment, lifestyle change and prevention.  The 25th Annual American Academy of Anti-Aging’s World Congress, and the 2017 MedTech Impact Expo & Conference, held alongside each other December 14-15, 2017 at the Venetian/Palazzo Resort in Las Vegas, will feature complementing CME and non-CME education, inspiring world-renowned and accredited industry-leaders, thousands of products and services, and sets the stage for effective discussions as to how emerging technologies can and will affect all levels of patient care. For more information, visit www.medtechimpact.com.

Physical Activity & Psychological Health

While research has long confirmed the strong correlation between exercise and psychological health, a recent study utilizing cellphone data to track activities and moods has confirmed that people who move are overall more content than people who sit.

While previous epidemiological studies have found that people who are active are less prone to depression and anxiety than sedentary people, the majority of these studies solely focused on negative moods. They generally relied on people recalling how they had felt, in addition to how much they had moved or sat in the previous weeks—with little concrete, tangible data to support their recollections.

The new study used a different approach, focusing on correlations between movement and the most positive emotion: happiness. The researchers also looked at what people reported about their respective activities, comparing it with objective measures of movement.

In doing this, the team first developed a special app for Android phones: advertised as helping people understand the ways in which lifestyles choices—like physical activity—might affect moods. As the app sent random requests throughout the day, during which people were asked to enter estimations of their current moods in addition to an assessment regarding their satisfaction with life in general, they also answered additional questions about whether they had been sitting, standing, walking, running, lying down, etc.

The app also asked about the users’ moods at that moment, simultaneously gathering data from the activity monitor built into almost every smartphone available today. Essentially, it checked whether someone’s recall of his/her movement tallied with the numbers from the activity monitor. Overall, the information provided by users and the activity monitors’ data was almost exactly the same.

People using the app also reported greater levels of happiness when they had been moving in the past quarter-hour, rather than when they had been sedentary—although often, they were not engaging in rigorous, strenuous activity. Researchers also found that people who moved more frequently tended to convey greater life satisfaction than those who spent most time in a chair.

The results suggest that people who are generally more active are generally happier, and in the moments during which they are active, they are also happier. While the study does not establish causation, the findings incontrovertibly indicate that if you get up and move often, you are more likely to feel cheerful than if you do not.

Virtual Reality: Potential for Parkinson’s

A newly published review of evidence and data has indicated that virtual reality (VR) holds potential for rehabilitation of Parkinson’s disease, the neurodegenerative disorder that has historically been managed by a combination of medication and physiotherapy. Virtual reality technology has been proposed as a new and inventive rehabilitation tool, one that can potentially optimize motor learning and replicate real-life scenarios in order to improve functional activities.

The study assessed the effect of VR training on gait and balance, in addition to an examination of the effects of VR on motor function, daily living activities, cognitive function, and quality of life. In comparison to physiotherapy, VR demonstrated an improvement in step and stride length and balance, by stimulating movement through computer-based games. The studies further revealed that VR exercise exhibited potential advantages over traditional exercise, as individuals were able to practice in a motivating and engaging environment.

As Parkinson’s disease has significant adverse effects on quality of life and independence, VR interventions may lead to greater improvements than physiotherapy. The idea that technology can effectively curb and treat a disease that impacts millions of people globally in a host of negative and difficult ways is an innovative and exciting breakthrough, which will likely generate further findings and discoveries.

Fighting Pain Without Painkillers

Statistics indicate that 140 people die each day from drug overdoses in the United States—most of them linked to opioids and painkillers. Due to the increasingly severe public health crisis, companies are now manufacturing new devices to replace addictive painkillers, and innovators are looking to technology for groundbreaking, inventive ways to tackle the increasingly critical opioid crisis.

A team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have founded Biobot Labs, merging a research collaboration between the departments of biological engineering and urban studies and planning. The ultimate goal was to design technology that “analyzes human waste flowing through the sewers at various points throughout the system,” and to test the wastewater systems for metabolized traces of various substances in order to isolate the places with the highest concentrations of opioid—or any drug—users. Co-founder and CEO of Biobot Labs Newsha Ghaeli has stated that the goal is to shift data collection away from overdose and death, and instead focus on overdose prevention and early detection.

New clinical trials have demonstrated considerable success for a device known as a spinal cord stimulator, engineered to alleviate back pain. After implanting the experimental device under the skin at the spine base, the technology sends a mild electric current to the spinal cord’s nerve fibers. Scientists believe that the therapy, known as neuromodulation or neurostimulation, interrupts the pain signals that are carried from the nerves to the brain. While the idea was originally conceived in the 1960s, recent years have seen the technology expand and grow.

Other less-invasive devices that can be used outside the body, and do not require surgery, stimulate the peripheral nerves: the network of nerves that connect the brain and spinal cord. Cleveland-based SPR Therapeutics, which received FDA clearance last year for its device, involves a simple nonsurgical procedure in which a tiny wire is placed under the skin—near the nerves—and connected externally to the stimulator, which can be worn anywhere on the body.

As opioid use and abuse in the United States has skyrocketed, these new medical devices could offer drug-free alternatives for some patients. Michael Leong, a pain specialist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, states that the benefit of these devices is that when patients use them, they are able to fake fewer or no pharmaceuticals. “People are afraid of opioids right now. There’s a stigma. Patients don’t want to be on opioids,” he says.

Wireless Wearables: Potential to Predict Disease 

A recent study at the 2016 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons confirms the burgeoning theory that wearable health technology, an innovation that has progressively gained traction in medical and consumer arenas, can positively affect healthcare and patients’ wellness. Moreover, researchers have found that data from smartwatches have the capabilities to both detect—and even predict—the onset of disease.

Because a large segment of the population utilizes smartwatches, an enormous amount of data and metrics portray a more comprehensive overview of health, as opposed to a solitary visit to the doctor. Researchers from Stanford University conducted a study during which they gave participants smartwatches, and subsequently analyzed almost a year of the data. Measurements included skin temperature, heart rate, and data collected from sleep.

When analyzing the data, the team found that ‘out-of-the-ordinary measurements’—specifically heart rate—had strong correlations with health issues like the common cold. Additionally, more detailed data was collected from several participants, for two years. Researchers evaluated this data, and chose the four dates during which measurements were out of the ordinary: the heart rate and skin temperature were specifically elevated. During a period when the measurements were abnormal, the participant had developed Lyme disease; during the other periods, he had a fever, or the common cold.

These measurements have strong correlations with inflammation, suggesting that the data was able to pinpoint and pick up on signs of inflammation. Other participants who were ill during the period they used smartwatches demonstrated measurements of elevated heart rate and skin temperatures. Moreover, in a separate experiment, the team found that insulin resistance had a connection to body mass index and heart rate—the latter of which was measured by a smartwatch.

The simplicity behind wearing a fitness wristband, and any wearable health technology, can more easily help surgeons detect which patients are at risk for complications. Evidence-based studies have demonstrated that the integration of wireless technology strongly correlates with ‘postoperative quality-of-life data,’ and reinforces research that surgeons should consistently track their patients’ results and quality of life.

These findings reaffirm the belief that surgeons have the capability to routinely measure patient-centered results–including anxiety, postoperative pain, and the ease with which patients can perform daily tasks and activities. While surgeons do not regularly practice this type of aftercare, and follow up on patients’ recovery, this monitoring system establishes an exciting and inventive kind of versatility, portability, and ultimate healthcare awareness that should be incorporated and put into practice.

The idea that smartwatches can predict and detect disease could become a widespread phenomenon, which would ultimately become an accessible and convenient tool for diagnosis. Wearables may have the potential to eliminate doctor visits, particularly for people who have geographical or monetary difficulties.

How Virtual Reality Can Change Medical Technology

Extensive research and data indicate that Virtual and Augmented Reality have the potential to change the face of medical technology: more importantly, the ways in which medical device designers operate, innovative, and create.

Yet the technologies have inevitable hurdles to overcome, despite the enormous progresses and successes in the past decade. While patients are incontrovertibly benefiting from the experience of virtual reality in certain areas, experts agree that in order for AR and VR to “disrupt” medical technology, the intrinsic challenges must be explained, understood, and faced.

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