December 13-15, 2018

MedTech Impact 2018

Venetian/Palazzo Resort

Las Vegas, NV

(561) 893-8633

info@medtechimpact.com

Category: Medical Technology

The Cost of Chronic Disease

The primary issue that consumes the majority of the burden of healthcare costs in the United States is preventable chronic disease: while the most prevalent health conditions are simultaneously the most avoidable, they continue to cost the country’s budget billions of dollars. While overall numbers have decreased since 2010, when chronic disease cost the U.S. a total of $315 billion, morbid obesity rates have continued to rapidly spike—a condition that leads to a range of critical health issues including heart disease, diabetes, and stroke.

Primary care providers have long faced the struggle of determining how to implement best practice care for patients diagnosed with chronic diseases. Recent studies indicate that almost half of the entire U.S. population has at least one chronic health condition—including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, obesity, or arthritis. Statistics designate these health care treatments costs to account for 86% of cumulative national healthcare spending, and the CDC reports that chronic conditions are the leading causes of death and disability in the country.

Yet the past decade has seen the advent and proliferation of digital health technology, spurring the generation of new techniques and strategies for healthcare professionals to utilize in chronic disease management. These types of technology vary in terms of accessibility and usability, but include remote monitoring, mobile health apps installable on phones, and wireless wearables—which serve as activity trackers.

A series of interviews conducted by Medical News Today demonstrate a bright future for the potential of new technology, and its ability to spur and provide high-quality care. Suzanne Falck, MD, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, noted that a highly successful digital tool is currently in use for the management of heart failure: an implanted sensor immediately transmits data to a healthcare practitioner, who then analyzes the data in order to make medical recommendations. Further clinical trials and studies indicate that remote monitoring is more cost-effective than traditional, conventional management.

Moreover, the burgeoning popularity of medical apps signifies that mobile technology can make a hugely positive impact on chronic disease management. There are currently approximately 259,000 medical health apps available to purchase; over half are aimed at targeting consumers with chronic conditions. Clinical trials have repeatedly shown that patients with type 2 diabetes who utilized an app to monitor their blood glucose levels showed greater benefits than those who did not. A recent article in Diabetes Technology& Therapeutics states that the prognosis in patients with diabetes is ‘strongly influenced by the degree of control of their disease,’ which reinforces the effectiveness of self-management support through mobile apps.

Another innovative and exciting development is wearable technology and devices, which are currently being studied in a variety of clinical research settings. Many healthcare providers believe that the ‘potential of this technology is endless,’ as they can improve access to care while simultaneously enhancing convenience—and likely patient compliance.

Most importantly, being conscious of medicinal needs and treatments requires a consistently high level of responsibility and awareness. Healthcare experts urge patients to take active, informed roles in managing their health: online workshops have been developed to offer chronic disease self-management programs, which have been proven to significantly improve health statuses. Moreover, healthcare practitioners and professionals must collectively work together and utilize the new landscape of digital medical technology to their patients’ benefits.

Healthcare in the Home: Technology & Patient Care

The increase in human lifespan—currently at an average of 80 years in developed countries—is often attributed to improved medical treatments and technologies, including innovations like the discovery of antibiotics and enhanced care for once-fatal occurrences like heart attacks. Yet advancements in medical technology also impact quality of life, particularly as people age. Many recent breakthroughs have improved seniors’ ability to remain healthy throughout the aging process, while simultaneously improving home care and challenges like overcrowded hospitals and remote populations.

The ways in which technology facilitates aging in place and patient care at home include wearable health devices, the concept of telehealth, and mobile apps. Wireless and wearable devices like Fitbits, smartwatches, and other technologies can provide useful data surrounding heart rate, calories, steps walked, sleep hygiene, and stress experienced. While these devices provide information to patients, they also can be configured to automatically deliver data to physicians—who can more accurately monitor patient health and continually screen for potential risk factors or new health issues. Moreover, in addition to devices that specifically monitor health, there are now wearable devices that can remind patients to take pills or perform other necessary medical tasks. Some predict that by 2018 over 81 million Americans will use some form of wearable technology.

The technological breakthroughs in communication and connectedness have also made it possible to provide healthcare services to remote places and populations. In 2016, approximately 74% of employers offered a ‘telehealth’ option as part of their medical service benefits. Through these services, a simple video chat with a clinician serves as a bridge for patient recommendations for treatment or further care. Because those who live in remote areas cannot easily access doctors’ offices—reports indicate that the physician-to-patient ratio in rural areas is 39 per 100,000, whereas in urban areas it is 53 per 100,000—telehealth technologies allow patients to easily access quality healthcare.

Finally, the ability to easily and rapidly connect customers with workers through mobile apps helps the healthcare industry by providing on-demand services to patients in need. These services include visiting patients’ homes, helping to set up smart devices, delivering medical products and equipment, and assisting with routine tasks. Not only does the need for on-demand professional services foster and create an entirely new industry, but it also dramatically improves home patient care.

Because the constant breakthroughs in technology are consistently increasing the human lifespan, the quality of our lives gains even more importance. Wearable medical devices, telehealth, and app-enabled, on-demand services can collectively help enhance the quality of healthcare in the home.

Speaker Spotlight: Dennis Robbins, M.P.H, Ph.D. | 2017 Conference Chair

Dennis Robbins (M.P.H. Harvard, Ph.D., Boston College) is a prominent innovator, thought leader, and health activist. His distinguished career spans multiple sectors of health, wellness, health care, industry, medical and surgical devices and technology, disruptive innovation, ethics and policy.  His initial work on patient-centric engagement and now person-centricity ™ has stimulated a major paradigmatic shift in how we think about health, healthcare, and next generation engagement across diverse ecosystems.

Dr. Robbins was a National Fund for Medical Education Fellow, Visiting Scholar and Research Fellow at Harvard. He has advised Presidential and White house commissions, the military health system, start-ups, two US Supreme Court Cases and chaired the PCMH 2.O national think tank where he created the concept of person-centricity™, to help people become and stay healthier while adding years to their lives and life to their years. He blends elements of health information technologies, ethics, behavioral economics, exercise physiology, sleep, mindfulness, and healthy eating to bend the sickness curve. He serves on the boards or advisory boards of several companies and national organizations including the Global Innovation and Leadership Council of Frost and Sullivan and the American Heart Assn’s Technology and Innovation Advisory Board.

Dr. Robbins was a major force in the early Hospice Movement and worked closely across both aisles and CMS in helping to promote the Hospice Medicare benefit. His legacy of nine books and more than 400 articles is complimented by a plethora keynote presentations and panels. He has been recognized in the national media in such publications as Forbes, Medical Economics, Modern Healthcare, Hospital Ethics, and Managed Healthcare Executive who depicted him as among the top ten keenest thinkers in Managed Care.

—————————————————————————————————–

Dr. Robbins serves as the Conference Chair for the MedTech Impact Expo & Conference, December 14-15, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV.  He will lead a number of sessions on the agenda: Leveraging Technology and Person-Centricity to Help People Add Years to Their Lives and Life to Their YearsImpacting Clinical Outcomes with Innovation and Technology (Panel); and Medtech Challenges and Opportunities. Review the full agenda.

 

 

 

The World’s First Digital Medicine

U.S. regulators recently approved what is being termed the ‘world’s first digital medicine’: a pill with an inbuilt sensor that can be tracked inside the stomach, and communicates data surrounding whether—and when—patients have taken critical medication. The Food and Drug Administration are permitting the device to be used in an antipsychotic medication, with the overall goal of increased medication adherence, and the hope that the data can be used to help both doctors and patients better manage treatment.

The issue of medication non-compliance has been an ongoing challenge for pharmaceutical companies, healthcare systems, providers, and patients alike. This technology, which was developed over the past decade by Silicon Valley-based Proteus Digital Health, will be incorporated into the antipsychotic medication Abilify—which has been taken by approximately 7 million people in the United States since its inception 15 years ago.

Chief executive of Proteus Andrew Thompson asserts that the technology would allow people “to engage with their care team about their treatment plan in a new way,” supplemented by the ability to use a mobile phone to track and manage medication regimens. When patients swallow the tablet, which contains the sensor, a signal is sent to a patch worn on the body, which subsequently connects to an app on the patient’s phone: showing that he/she has taken the necessary dose. The prescribing physician will automatically receive the data; patients can also choose for family members and other providers to get the notifications. Moreover, the wearable patch has the capacity to track levels of physical activity—considered a key indicator of overall health and wellness—and allow patients to self-report mood and sleep quality.

This landmark regulatory clearance highlights the burgeoning high-tech evolution in the ways drugs are delivered, which can ultimately assist in curbing the estimated $300 billion in wasted medical spending caused by patient non-adherence. One of the bedrock pillars of the digital health revolution is making it easier for patients to comply with drug regimens, while simultaneously tracking their habits. Yet digital tracking is one of several outlined approaches to increase patient compliance; companies like Intarcia and Braeburn Pharmaceuticlas are pursuing other tactics, including the creation of implantable devices that contain up to one year’s worth of treatments for people with chronic medical needs.

Speaker Spotlight: Amanda Goltz

Amanda L. Goltz, MPA is the Vice President of Digital Innovation at BTG, a global medtech firm, managing the portfolio of digital initiatives combining clinical interventions, device technology, and digital services to incorporate the patient experience and improve measurable outcomes.  Previously, Amanda was the Director of Product Strategy and Innovation at Aetna, sourcing emerging solutions from the digital health and innovative networks marketplace, pairing them with employer clients, and directing implementation of the solutions at scale.

Amanda has also managed the Innovation and Consumer Engagement portfolio at Pacific Business Group on Health (PBGH), a coalition of 60 employers who collectively provide self-funded health coverage to over 10M employees and dependents at an annual cost of $12B.  Prior to PBGH, Amanda was senior advisor to the national healthcare practice at Manatt Health Solutions.  From 2005 to 2009, Amanda served as Program Director at Partners Healthcare, the integrated delivery network founded by Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital, managing a system-wide quality improvement initiatives.  Amanda advises several start-up companies as a mentor at 500Startups, Rock Health, and StartXMed, health and life sciences incubator for Stanford University.   Amanda received her MPA in Health Finance and Management from New York University and her BA from Columbia College of Columbia University.

More health content from Amanda Goltz:

BTG buys Oncoverse–Amanda Goltz explains all | thehealthcareblog.com
Amanda Goltz is a massive ball of energy in the world of digital health. For the past 2 years she’s been working for English pharma company BTG…

Thinking Digital: We Can Do Better Than Just Apps | MedCity News
With the advent of digital technology, pharma and med device companies need to start rethinking …

—————————————————————————————————–

Amanda will host a session, ‘How Much Should We Pay for Healthcare? Technology’s Answer to Measuring Value’, on Friday, December 15 (10:05 a.m.) at the upcoming MedTech Impact Expo & Conference.

 

 

 

Speaker Spotlight: Nikhil Krishnan

Nikhil Krishnan is a research analyst at CB Insights. His research focuses on biotechnology/drug development, digital health, autonomous vehicles, and consumer products. He is a graduate from Columbia University, and has worked at several other startups in the past, including Relationship Science, Global Thermostat, and Uber. His research has been featured several times in the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, New York Times, and Reuters.

Nikhil Krishnan, CB Insights

Nikhil publishes a weekly digital health newsletter, with content focussed on examining how startups and corporations are approaching the intersection of healthcare and technology.

Sign up for access to these briefings:

Apple in Healthcare

Genomics, CRISPR, and the Future of Personalized Medicine

The Digital Hospital: 80+ companies Reinventing Medicine in One Infographic

The Disruption of Digital Health

Nikhil will host a session, Healthcare 2.0: Macrotrends Shaping Healthcare Delivery, on Thursday, December 14 (9:05 a.m.) at the upcoming MedTech Impact Expo & Conference.  For more information and to review the full agenda, click here.

Cloud DX’s Vitaliti Wins Bold Epic Innovator Award

Medical technology firm Cloud DX recently won the “Bold Epic Innovator Award” through the Qualcomm Tricorder X Prize® contest, with its pioneering innovation the

Cloud DX’s Vitaliti, winner of the the “Bold Epic Innovator Award” through the Qualcomm Tricorder X Prize® Contest
Larry Steinberg, EVP of Business Development with Cloud DX demonstrates the Vitaliti

Vitaliti. An advanced wearable device designed to act as a continuous vital sign monitor, the neckband and earpiece—connected to an advanced mobile app through four interdependent wireless devices—can diagnose up to 16 medical conditions. With the mantra “sophisticated solutions for advanced healthcare providers,” Cloud DX’s overarching mission is to streamline and simplify digital tools that help measure and gauge health and wellness. Through its four fundamental pillars of innovation, collaboration, integration, and transformation, Cloud DX represents the forefront of healthcare: an industry rapidly growing and expanding through invention.

ThinAir Announces New Conversational Interface and Impact Assessment Tool for Data Security

ThinAir, a security startup whose mission is to allow organizations to detect and investigate insider threats in seconds, has launched a new interface and impact assessment tool, ThinAir 2.0 – a conversational interface that allows for quick assessments of security incidents and their financial impact.  The new tool – which the developer describes as “siri for Security” is among a number of new security technologies being introduced to help combat the data security breach epidemic.

It seems every time we turn on the news these past few years, there are reports of yet another massive data breach or identity theft story. According to research from the Identity Theft Resource Center (TRC) and CyberScout, healthcare data accounted for more than 34% of reported breaches in 2016.  As one technology makes it harder for fraud to occur (i.e. the introduction of micro-chipped credit cards to the US in 2015), criminals focus on other avenues to commit fraud.  Unfortunately, criminals aren’t the only ones causing these breaches; according to the same report, employee error or negligence was the leading cause for healthcare data breaches in 2016, with 43 reported incidents exposing 1,183,893 records. Aside from employee error, 3rd party businesses, associates and subcontractors also exposed 4 million records in 2016. Hacking and cyber-attacks aside, basic misuse of customer service login information, privilege misuse (abuse of privilege to access data for illegitimate purposes), and miscellaneous errors such as losing a physical folder of documents, or sending an email to an incorrect address, are among the most common reasons healthcare data is breached. As a matter of fact, the healthcare industry is the only industry where employees are the predominant cause of data breaches.*

While these statistics are alarming, there are steps healthcare institutions and practices can take to head off these breaches: making sure antivirus and operating systems are up to date, using encryptions and secure passwords, and making sure cloud based systems are paired with reputable and high-level security. Ongoing assessment and monitoring proves useful when unforeseen circumstances do cause a breach, and make it easy to investigate quickly and take action.

That’s where products like ThinAir 2.0 come into play, where quick access is critical when handling healthcare data. Quickly detecting and containing breaches lowers risk, and ultimately cost. “As information becomes the primary asset for today’s organizations, ThinAir’s technology provides visibility and impact assessment,” said Tony Gauda, founder and CEO of ThinAir. “We turn analysts into superheroes by surfacing all user-information interactions, with simplicity and speed.” ThinAir is HIPAA, and SOC-2 (Type 2) compliant as well as ITAT/EAR compliant, is authorized to manage sensitive data for a variety of industries and can help organizations achieve compliance.

Data breaches can significantly damage a healthcare organization’s reputation and result in loss of trust, or worse, patients entirely. Making sure to have proactive and secure processes, assessment, monitoring and investigative tools seems like a better plan.

_____________________________________________________

*source: Verizon 2017 Data Breach Investigation Report

Speaker Spotlight: Amy Dixon

Amy Dixon is a Patient Advocate, Elite Paratriathlete, and motivational speaker, speaking on television and radio and at seminars around the world, on subjects pertaining to triumph over adversity, leadership, team work, rare disease management, patient advocacy, and how to achieve a full life despite devastating setbacks.

Amy Dixon, Patient Advocate, Elite Paratriathlete, and motivational speaker

Amy lost 98% of her sight due to a rare type of Uveitis (an inflammatory autoimmune eye disease), and now travels the world with her guide dog Woodstock by her side, speaking to groups about her passion for empowering patients to educate and advocate for themselves in the face of illness and disease. She is the Vice President of Glaucoma Eyes International Organization, where she serves as a coach and mentor to many visually impaired athletes, eye disease and autoimmune disease patients, helping them live lives beyond their disability and disease through her vast resources and expertise.

She is a Certified Wine Specialist from the Society of Wine Educators, with 20 years’ experience as a wine expert and educator, a graduate of the Dale Carnegie Institute for Public Speaking and Leadership.

Amy is also an elite Paratriathlete, 2016 USA Paratriathlon National Team Member, and currently ranked #3 in the world in the sport of Paratriathlon as a visually impaired female.  Last year, she founded Camp “No Sight No Limits” to train more blind athletes to become elite in the sport, ensuring the future of blind triathlon in the USA.  Amy also is the currently ITU Aquathlon World Champion.  She is currently racing and training to make the US Team for the Tokyo Paralympics in 2020.

Amy speaks about empowering yourself to overcome obstacles, such as illness, injury and professional challenges by educating yourself and becoming an expert in what challenges you. She shows why building the right team and utilizing technology is the key to success in life, and life with rare disease.  Her message, “One does not need sight to have vision,” powerfully reflects her determination to succeed in all aspects of her professional and personal and athletic life.

On Friday, December 15, at 1:00pm, Amy will join MedTech Impact 2017 Conference Chair Dennis Robbins, M.P.H, Ph.D, and fellow panelists Jennifer Joe, M.D., CEO & Founder, Medstro.com; Rain Henderson, Advisor, Clinton Foundation; and Peter Tippett, M.D., Ph.D., CEO, HealthCelerate, for a discussion around becoming a vanguard rather than a victim when faced with uncertainty and adversity.  For more information, visit www.MedTechImpact.com/agenda.

For more information about Amy Dixon, visit http://www.amydixonusa.com.

Osso VR wins US DOE EdSim Challenge

The U.S. Department of Education announced Osso VR as the winner in the EdSim Challenge, which called for virtual reality, video game developer, and educational technology communities to submit concepts for immersive simulations that will prepare students for a globally competitive workforce and spur an ecosystem of virtual and augmented reality technology in education.

Five finalists were selected out of 249 submissions. Each finalist received $50,000 in cash as well as in-kind prizes from Oculus and Samsung, and refined their submissions during the Virtual Accelerator phase. Finalists presented playable prototypes to the judges at Demo Day on September 18, 2017, where a live audience joined the Challenge judges at the Department Of Education to see the five finalists compete for the $430,000 grand prize.  The winner was recommended by a panel of judges with expertise in education, gaming, workforce development, emerging technology, and venture capital.

Osso VR is a hands-on surgical training platform that enables users to practice cutting-edge techniques through realistic, hands-on simulations, bridging the gap between career exploration and career preparation. They won $430,000 in cash and additional in-kind prizes from IBM and Microsoft.

Learn more about each of the five finalists’ simulations here.

_________________________________________

Learn more about Osso VR at the 2017 MedTech Impact Expo & Conference in Las Vegas, December 14-15, where Justin Barad, Founder & CEO of Osso VR and editor of medgadget.com will moderate a panel session, New Realities in Medicine – Exploring the Virtual and Augmented Horizon. Other speakers in the session include Arshya Vahabzadeh, M.D., Chief Medical Officer at Brainpower, Matthew Stoudt, CEO of AppliedVR, Carrie Shaw, CEO of Embodied Labs, and Osamah Choudhry, CEO at MediVis. LEARN MORE.