December 11-13, 2021

MedTech Impact 2021

Venetian/Palazzo Resort

Las Vegas, NV

(561) 893-8633

info@medtechimpact.com

News & Insights

MEDTECH IMPACT MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY NEWS

A Miracle Medical Chip: Devices that Heal

Researchers at Ohio State University have taken the first step in creating a medical chip that could ultimately heal almost any injury or disease.

The development of a small, dime-sized silicone device—known as Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT)—uses nanotechnology to actively reprogram a person’s cellular makeup. By simply placing the chip on a wound, the device sends an electrical pulse designed to convert living cells into whatever necessary cells the body requires. The pulse “opens a small window into the cell,” allowing the chip to transmit an entirely new genetic code. Moreover, the entire process takes less than one second.

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CMO School: How to Become a Medical Advisor

MedTech Impact is excited to announce a new workshop: “CMO School: How to Become a Medical Advisor,” developed, designed, and presented by Arlen Meyers, MD, MBA. As President and CEO of the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, in addition to professor emeritus at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the Colorado School of Public Health, Modern Healthcare named Dr. Meyers one of the ‘50 Most Influential Physician Executives’ of 2011, with subsequent nominations in both 2012 and 2013.

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Fighting Pain Without Painkillers

Statistics indicate that 140 people die each day from drug overdoses in the United States—most of them linked to opioids and painkillers. Due to the increasingly severe public health crisis, companies are now manufacturing new devices to replace addictive painkillers, and innovators are looking to technology for groundbreaking, inventive ways to tackle the increasingly critical opioid crisis.

A team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have founded Biobot Labs, merging a research collaboration between the departments of biological engineering and urban studies and planning. The ultimate goal was to design technology that “analyzes human waste flowing through the sewers at various points throughout the system,” and to test the wastewater systems for metabolized traces of various substances in order to isolate the places with the highest concentrations of opioid—or any drug—users. Co-founder and CEO of Biobot Labs Newsha Ghaeli has stated that the goal is to shift data collection away from overdose and death, and instead focus on overdose prevention and early detection.

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Wireless Wearables: Potential to Predict Disease 

A recent study at the 2016 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons confirms the burgeoning theory that wearable health technology, an innovation that has progressively gained traction in medical and consumer arenas, can positively affect healthcare and patients’ wellness. Moreover, researchers have found that data from smartwatches have the capabilities to both detect—and even predict—the onset of disease.

Because a large segment of the population utilizes smartwatches, an enormous amount of data and metrics portray a more comprehensive overview of health, as opposed to a solitary visit to the doctor. Researchers from Stanford University conducted a study during which they gave participants smartwatches, and subsequently analyzed almost a year of the data. Measurements included skin temperature, heart rate, and data collected from sleep.

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FDA Encourages Development of Medical Technology

The Food and Drug Administration has recently announced a program that actively encourages the development of medical digital technology, including wireless wearables and applications that can monitor blood pressure and heart rate, track intake of calories, and measure physical activity.

The program is designed to give pre-clearance to developers working on digital health products, as the approval process for apps sometimes includes burdensome regulations, which can increase costs and limit innovation: the FDA hopes to reduce development costs and give entrepreneurs increased opportunities to develop products.

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Investing in Digital Health

Several of the world’s largest and most successful companies are investing in digital health, including Amazon, Google, and Microsoft. Amazon is heavily investing in health, across a number of different areas, and Google is likewise “ramping up its health cloud business.” Apple and Nokia recently announced a partnership on digital health, designed to advance medical support.

Amazon has also recently landed a health-tech hire from the company Box, a cloud content management and file sharing service for businesses. Missy Krasner, who previously helped build the cloud storage company’s health product, will transition to Amazon. Krasner was also a founding member of Google Health, the company’s online medical records and wellness platform.

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How Virtual Reality Can Change Medical Technology

Extensive research and data indicate that Virtual and Augmented Reality have the potential to change the face of medical technology: more importantly, the ways in which medical device designers operate, innovative, and create.

Yet the technologies have inevitable hurdles to overcome, despite the enormous progresses and successes in the past decade. While patients are incontrovertibly benefiting from the experience of virtual reality in certain areas, experts agree that in order for AR and VR to “disrupt” medical technology, the intrinsic challenges must be explained, understood, and faced.

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Announcement of NHS Funding

An announcement from the government has recently stated that the National Health Service–the publicly funded national healthcare system for England, and the largest, oldest single-payer healthcare system in the world–will receive £86 million worth of funding over the next three years.

This effort is designed to spur innovation, and help firms further develop medical advancements and technology. The release states that businesses will have the opportunity to ‘bid for funding’ in order to aid developments, which could potentially run the gamut from digital technologies to new inventive medications.

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