December 14-15, 2017

MedTech Impact 2017

Venetian/Palazzo Resort

Las Vegas, NV

(561) 893-8633

info@medtechimpact.com

Month: September 2017

Spotlight: Flex Innovation Center

Journalists attending AdvaMed’s 2017 The MedTech Conference were treated to a behind the scenes look at Flex’s Silicon Valley Innovation Center. Flex, (formally Flextronics) a $25B global electronics manufacturer with 200,000 employees globally, has been utilizing their expertise contract manufacturing across dozens of industries, to apply the lessons learned and fast paths to innovation that are accelerating product development.

Flex’s “Sketch to Scale” comes to life in their innovation center and robotics lab. From conception and design to prototyping and advanced engineering, Flex’s Innovation Center is where the majority of today’s “smart home” and “connected health” technology is designed and manufactured.

“We make everything for everybody,” said John Carlson, President of Flex Health Solutions. Highlights from the tour included flexible circuitry, printed on a stretchable material, that could (potentially) be used to monitor skin biometrics, a sweat sensor that is able to read blood glucose levels from sweat, and an advanced robotics lab that allows Flex to streamline the R&D, design and manufacturing process for their clients.

For more information, visit www.flex.com.

NCQA Patient-Centered Medical Home: Updated & Upgraded

The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), an independent non-profit organization that works to improve health care quality, has given its patient-centered medical home ‘a makeover’ in order to “reduce documentation burdens, lower costs, and facilitate quality improvements.”

The NCQA’s move marks a growing effort spearheaded by the healthcare industry’s leadership organizations in response to new technologies, uncertainty surrounding reimbursements, and heightened reporting requirements. The organization’s recent announcement of a comprehensive overhaul will enact changes that aim to create “a much more user-friendly version of the popular practice transformation framework that avoids the pain points of previous iterations of the program,” said Michael S. Barr, MD, Executive Vice President of the Quality Measurement and Research Group at NCQA.

Due to a host of complaints from physicians and providers regarding the ‘unduly onerous’ recognition process, the NCQA wishes to reduce or eliminate costs, lower documentation burdens, and streamline some of the aspects of the recognition process that were devaluing patient care. A marked change is the abolition of distinctions between Level 1, 2, and 3; providers are now recognized or working towards recognition. The NCQA and healthcare industry realizes that ‘all-or-nothing measurements’ are not the optimal, most effective way to encourage innovation and improvement.

Moreover, the NCQA has replaced the three-year recertification cycle with annual check-ins, so that providers are not required to go through the entire recognition process again. Yearly meetings are designed to ensure that recognized practices are primarily focused on a high level of patient-centered care, and continuously improving. Each practice will also be assigned an NCQA representative, who can assist them in moving throughout the process, and also confirm and certify that the practice has met the necessary requirements.

Barr hopes that the revamped PCMH recognition process will help providers move towards a more efficient, effective way to deliver care, but admits that they will need more than yearly check-ins to succeed in an increasingly data-driven world. He urged stakeholders that it is time to “optimize electronic health records (EHRs), so that we can really align them with what we need to do to improve patient care.” Barr further clarifies that EHRs should be redesigned in order to effectively communicate the patients’ stories, and simultaneously equip providers with the necessary data to make informed, personalized, and effective choices with the patient and caregivers.

Physical Activity & Psychological Health

While research has long confirmed the strong correlation between exercise and psychological health, a recent study utilizing cellphone data to track activities and moods has confirmed that people who move are overall more content than people who sit.

While previous epidemiological studies have found that people who are active are less prone to depression and anxiety than sedentary people, the majority of these studies solely focused on negative moods. They generally relied on people recalling how they had felt, in addition to how much they had moved or sat in the previous weeks—with little concrete, tangible data to support their recollections.

The new study used a different approach, focusing on correlations between movement and the most positive emotion: happiness. The researchers also looked at what people reported about their respective activities, comparing it with objective measures of movement.

In doing this, the team first developed a special app for Android phones: advertised as helping people understand the ways in which lifestyles choices—like physical activity—might affect moods. As the app sent random requests throughout the day, during which people were asked to enter estimations of their current moods in addition to an assessment regarding their satisfaction with life in general, they also answered additional questions about whether they had been sitting, standing, walking, running, lying down, etc.

The app also asked about the users’ moods at that moment, simultaneously gathering data from the activity monitor built into almost every smartphone available today. Essentially, it checked whether someone’s recall of his/her movement tallied with the numbers from the activity monitor. Overall, the information provided by users and the activity monitors’ data was almost exactly the same.

People using the app also reported greater levels of happiness when they had been moving in the past quarter-hour, rather than when they had been sedentary—although often, they were not engaging in rigorous, strenuous activity. Researchers also found that people who moved more frequently tended to convey greater life satisfaction than those who spent most time in a chair.

The results suggest that people who are generally more active are generally happier, and in the moments during which they are active, they are also happier. While the study does not establish causation, the findings incontrovertibly indicate that if you get up and move often, you are more likely to feel cheerful than if you do not.