December 13-15, 2019

MedTech Impact 2019

Venetian/Palazzo Resort

Las Vegas, NV

(561) 893-8633

info@medtechimpact.com

Category: Wearables

Wearables Making Impact on Wellness Program

Employers and insurers are looking to wearable technology to gauge the progress of wellness programs on their workforce.

Firms are turning to wearables not just for participation and engagement data but also to ensure that their plans are more effective in improving outcomes and reducing risks to health, according to a Springbuk Report, “Employer Guide to Wearables 2.0” cited in ProBen.

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Wearables Making Impact on Wellness Program

Fitbit Addresses Diabetes Management

A recent article in Harvard Business Review details the ways in which digital health care can help prevent chronic diseases like diabetes. One of the most expensive and rampant chronic diseases, treatment for diabetes exacts a staggering cost of $245 billion each year, with an estimated 30.3 million people affected.

A number of digital health interventions can be used to address chronic conditions like diabetes, with the ultimate goals of reducing costs, improving patients’ involvement in their own care, and mitigating the overwhelming burden of chronic diseases in the U.S. Most recently, Fitbit has demonstrated its interest in addressing diabetes management, forming partnerships with medical device giant Medtronic and DexCom.

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Wearables Potential Impact on the Top 10 Causes of Death

In 2012, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) indicated about half of all adults (117 million people at the time) had one or more chronic health conditions. By 2014, seven of the top 10 causes of death were chronic diseases, with heart disease and cancer accounting for nearly 46% of all deaths each year. The costliest (86% of the nation’s $2.7 trillion annual health care expenditures) chronic health problems like heart disease, stroke, cancer, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and arthritis, are among the most prevalent, and continue to be on the rise. Considering lack of exercise or physical activity, poor nutrition, tobacco use, and excessive alcohol consumption is linked to most of these diseases – they also are the most preventable and reversible. However, compliance in lifestyle change, monitoring and medication management of chronic disease has proven to be a great challenge for clinicians and patients alike. Thanks to innovations and advancements in technology, this is becoming more accessible and convenient for both patient and clinician. Read More